How the FSF works: proposing your idea

Conference voting CC LiberalDemocrats

Ever asked yourself “Why doesn’t the FSF campaign for X, Y and Z?”, disagreed with something we’ve said or wanted to shape the FSF’s campaigning?

If so, the solution is a simple one - propose a motion at our AGM and argue its merits. Fellow fans can debate your proposal and either vote it down or pass it, so it becomes official FSF policy.

A good example of motions becoming policy was from our 2012 AGM, when Northampton Town fan Bob Ward proposed a motion opposing the advertising of pay-day lenders at football matches. The issue received much coverage and delegates passed Bob’s motion.

When the story over Newcastle United's deal with Wonga became national news, this gave us a policy bedrock - set by members - to argue against pay-day lenders' role in football. Bob's voice made a real difference.

Any FSF appearances in the media, or stories on the news section of our website, try to fairly reflect the FSF's democratically-set policies.

How do I submit a motion?

First-off, anyone submitting a motion has to be a member of the FSF – it’s free to join and takes two minutes, click here to fill out the form.

For a motion to then be accepted for debate it must have both a proposer and a seconder (both will be invited to speak on the matter). So it’s important to engage other fans on the matter – you can head to FSF Roadshows, FSF Divisional meetings, talk to your club’s fan groups and test the water on social media.

Any motion should be concise and to-the-point, clearly expressing what it is seeking to achieve, and set out the current situation in relation to that issue – you can expand on specific points in your short speech (you can read more about how to write your motion in the link below).

You should also think about what practical measures the FSF could take to implement your idea. The most utopian and well-meaning ideal might be rejected if it’s deemed to be pie-in-the-sky by your fellow members.

We ask for motions in advance to avoid duplication, to circulate information to members in a timely fashion and to avoid spurious nonsense taking up time on the day. You might think it’s a disgrace that Wham Bars aren't served at your stadium, but this isn’t the stage for that debate.